Reflections on the Boston Marathon tragic events

Introduction by Marc Lavine.

Like all people of conscience, we are deeply saddened by the Boston marathon bombings. As educators and Bostonians, these events affected us deeply and personally. One of our former students was among the dead, as was a child from the neighborhood where our campus is located. One of Boston’s many international students perished as did a committed campus police officer. Many nursing students from our school were among the first responders. Several of us know people who were injured or have personal connections to the marathon.

All of this makes it difficult to write about these events. We are still reeling. We have a range of emotions. It seems inappropriate however to carry on leaving this event uncommented on. Yet we are cautious about speaking outside of our respective areas of research expertise. We do not want to approach tragedy opportunistically. We are also aware that our contributions do little to provide healing in the near term. We hope that addressing underlying organizational dynamics, critical perspectives, and relevant facets of social change can contribute to understanding.

We present initial pieces here by our colleagues Banu Ozkazanc-Pan and Mary Still. Banu’s post is called “Terrorists: Some you see, some you don’t”. Mary’s article is titled “Crowdsourced social order in Boston: technology replaces relationships?” Please take a look. Comments welcome!

We may add additional pieces in the next several weeks.  Any blog posting is, inherently, far from definitive and solely expresses the views of the author. We hope, therefore, that readers share links to writing about the events that they have found particularly insightful or useful. We also encourage people to support recovery efforts such as One Fund Boston as well as more localized efforts. https://secure.onefundboston.org/page/contribute/default

Related post:

Banu Ozkazanc-Pan: “Terrorists: Some you see, some you don’t”
Mary Still: “Crowdsourced social order in Boston: technology replaces relationships?”

Advertisements

One thought on “Reflections on the Boston Marathon tragic events

  1. Pingback: Crowdsourced social order in Boston: technology replaces relationships? | Organizations and Social Change

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s